Review: Lamy Safari Vista Fountain Pen - Demonstrator Clear

Lamy Safari Vista Fountain Pen - Demonstrator Clear


Finally bought myself a Lamy Safari fountain pen after reading so many reviews on Amazon.

I actually bought two, the version with the transparent body, also known as the Demonstrator. The body is shiny but after months of use, scratches have appeared on the body, but it's still transparent enough to see through.

It looks great. You can see the ink inside the system behind the nib, so you can know how much ink remains in the cartridge.

The back body has two big holes that also enables you to see the cartridge inside. This is more useful for the other Lamy Safari fountain pens that are not transparent.

This is a moderately priced fountain pen. Its construction is made of plastic except for the nib and clip. It's lightweight, but some might consider it to feel a bit cheap because of the weight. The design isn't very fanciful but it gets the job done.


The silver clip on the cap is like a huge paper clip.

The grip is indented for placement for the thumb and index. It's relatively comfortable for writing. The pen handles very well, and is well balanced to hold. I'm using the Noodler's black ink with it and it writes very smoothly.


The nibs come in various sizes, which are extra-fine, fine and medium. Fine is something like a Copic 0.8 and extra fine is about 0.5. I recommend getting the extra-fine if you're getting just one pen. You can easily swap the nibs.


The fountain pen comes with one disposable ink cartridge. So it's more economical to get the Lamy Safari Converter which is the recyclable ink cartridge (the red one you see in the picture above).


There's are two small protruding parts on the converter. The protruding part will actually slide into the groove of the pen so it actually prevents you from pushing the converter too far in. I don't see this in other fountain pens and I think it's a pretty cool feature.

The nib is not a flex nib so it's only capable of producing consistent lines, pretty much like a technical pen. Take note of this if you're thinking of drawing with this pen.

It's a great entry level fountain pen at a very affordable price. It's very functional and feels durable enough.

Below are some sketches I drew with the pen. You might note that the strokes feather slightly because the paper used was quite lousy.

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5 Comments

Hey

Hey

I bought those lamy fountain pens and noodler's inks after your recommendations. And it appeared to fail all my expectations. What I wanted is to get a waterproof black ink to work with aquarella. Not sure on that now... Guess I should just let the paper dry over some period (an hour / night?). Waiting for a couple of minutes didn't help. The ink smudged over the paper and stayed on my finger. How am I supposed to paint over it?

And about Lamy pens the Vista one. I took F and it's a disaster. It scratches the paper, the ink is bleeding through the nib and all over it. Drawing on plain office paper is ok, but on watercolour paper - is hardly bearable.

I had a similar issue using a

I had a similar issue using a Lamy Safari (which I enjoy) with Noodler's Black ink (which is great for writing, but not for drawing). When I would ink a picture and then erase the pencil, the Noodler's black ink would smudge on the page. I now use Platinum Carbon ink in my Lamy Safari for drawing and have not had any issues with this waterproof ink. I still use the Noodler's for writing, but not for drawing.

Nice review.

Nice review.
Can you tell me about the converter. Does it have the twist and turn mechanism or is there a lever to scroll up and down (like in Parker Vectors)?

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