Book Review: Paris versus New York: A Tally of Two Cities

Paris versus New York: A Tally of Two Cities is a book that's born out of the blog of the same title created by Vahram Muratyan.

Each page is a visual match pitting Paris against New York. The graphics are drawn in simple vector style. It's fun to look at and if you're from either Paris or New York, you can relate more to it.

Paris versus New York: A Tally of Two Cities is available at Amazon (US | CA | UK | DE | FR | IT | ES | JP | CN) and Book Depository

Paris versus New York: A Tally of Two Cities - 01

Paris versus New York: A Tally of Two Cities - 02

Paris versus New York: A Tally of Two Cities - 03

Paris versus New York: A Tally of Two Cities - 04

Paris versus New York: A Tally of Two Cities - 05

Paris versus New York: A Tally of Two Cities - 06

Paris versus New York: A Tally of Two Cities - 07


There's also the 100-postcard version of the book.
Availability: Amazon (US | CA | UK | DE | FR | IT | ES | JP | CN) and Book Depository


This deluxe edition is almost A4 size compared to the A5 size of the original edition. It's expanded with 30 more pairings.
Availability: Amazon (US | CA | UK | DE | FR | IT | ES | JP | CN) and Book Depository

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Here are direct links to the book:
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3 Comments

In the first picture the

In the first picture the spelling of "expresso" is incorrect. It is suppose to be without an "x". Haha of all publishers you'd think Penguin would check these things (especially since there aren't many words in the book). It looks like a nice book though...

Expresso is the proper French

Expresso is the proper French spelling. Sometimes it's abbreviated to express'.

Never seen it without the 'x'. Maybe you were confusing it with English. The left pages are in French, the right in English.

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